Don’t Toss That Sour Milk! And Other Tips To Cut Kitchen Food Waste

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

As we show in the video above, this is what chef Dan Barber demonstrated earlier this year, when he temporarily turned Blue Hill, his Michelin-starred restaurant in New York City, into an incubator for garbage-to-plate dining.

Barber’s intent was to raise awareness about the vast issue of food waste. As we’ve reported, an estimated 133 billion pounds of food is wasted in the U.S. each year. The typical American family tosses out about $1,500 of food yearly.

All this wasted food is the largest component of solid waste in our landfills, and when it rots, it emits methane — a potent greenhouse gas linked to climate change.

So, you may be wondering, what can I do in my own kitchen?

I talked to Dana Gunders of the Natural Resources Defense Council. Her new book, Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook, which is out this month, is full of tips for tackling food waste at home. An edited transcript of our conversation follows.

I’ve got to start with my favorite tip in the book: eggs. There’s actually a simple test to tell whether they’re still good to eat?

Yes. I was really surprised to learn that eggs are good for three to five weeks after their expiration date. And a trick to know if they’re still good is to put them in a bowl of water, and if the eggs sink, they’re still good to eat. But if they float, they’re not good to eat.

The science is that the eggshells are somewhat air permeable, and so over time, they lose moisture and it gets replaced with air.

refrigerator
Most fruits and vegetables — particularly after being cut — store better in an airtight container, Gunders says. And it’s best to store them in see-through containers so we don’t forget about them.

Yes. I was really surprised to learn that eggs are good for three to five weeks after their expiration date. And a trick to know if they’re still good is to put them in a bowl of water, and if the eggs sink, they’re still good to eat. But if they float, they’re not good to eat.

The science is that the eggshells are somewhat air permeable, and so over time, they lose moisture and it gets replaced with air.

Read more: http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/09/23/441460163/don-t-toss-that-sour-milk-10-tips-cut-food-waste-in-your-kitchen

Related blog post: Delaware MET Needs To Return Their $175,000 Charter School Performance Fund

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